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FAQ

Frequency Asked Questions

Do you drain canned beans?

Either way is fine. Adding the liquid can add richness but draining can reduce sodium. Don't drain veggies like tomatoes or sweet potatoes. For Lentils and Split Peas, use dry bags and rinse them prior.

What kind of veggies? Fresh or Frozen?

The measurement are given for frozen veggies by weight (shown on bagged veggies). But use whatever is available to you or what you prefer. 

Are the Allergen Friendly?

Click here for more information.

What's the expiration date?

They have a "best by" date of about 16 months from manufacturing but they're still useful after that date.

What are the ingredients? 

They're mostly herbs and spices with some salt. The fizz is made with acids and bases found naturally in our bodies: sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. We may add other buffers like calcium carbonate and ascorbic acid (Vit. C).  

How much water do I use?

The amount of water for the recipe is listed under the recipe ingredients for each seasoning. Don't fill the whole 5 qt pot with water; it's generally 2-4 cups. It may seem like too little water but the food will release some water as it cooks. You may want to add more if the water line drops below the level of the food during cooking. Make sure the water heats up again before adding the Broth Bomb™ to get a food reaction.

Can I use dry beans?

Yes, just cook them before adding other ingredients and the Broth Bomb®. Legumes like split pea and lentils don't have to be pre-cooked.

Can I use Broth Bomb™ in a pressure cooker?

The additional pressure created by Broth Bomb™ is minor compared to the steam during cooking but pressure cookers gaskets are known to break so use at your own discretion. We recommend pressure cooking your dry legumes and tubers prior to cooking with the Broth Bomb™.

Can I use them in a crock-pot or slow cooker?

Yes. First, boil the water. Then, add the hot water and beans to the crock-pot. Next, add the Broth Bomb. Stir till it dissipates. Then, add everything else. Requires a 6-quart crockpot. Make sure temperature reaches 160F.

Are they vegan?

Yes. Both the seasonings and the suggested recipes are all vegan.

Do they come with a recipe?

Yes. The recipe is on each product page. Look at the box images.

Why was it bland?

They're reduced sodium, so some people will want to add extra salt to better bring out the flavors for their unique palate. 1/2 tbsp in the pot should do.

Are they safe?

Yes, when boiled the fizz ingredients breakdown; adding minerals into the stew and aromatic CO2 into the air. When used as directed Broth Bomb™ is a safe product. Intended use is at least one gallon (4.5 qts) of cooked stew. Be careful when placing the Broth Bomb™ in hot food. Cooking with Broth Bomb® is recommended for ages 14 and up. We're extremely health-conscious individuals and we've personally used these products for years. We care deeply about public health and assure you they are safe. Even our own cells naturally make bicarbonate and citric acid. As with most things, if you have any condition or special circumstance affecting your health consult your doctor prior to use. That can be said for the salt, herbs, and spices as well as the fizzy ingredients. 

Can I break them in half? 

Yes. You can cut them with a knife. Make at least 2 quarts of stew with a half of a Broth Bomb™. Or use half of one with the full recipe if you're on a low sodium diet.

Can I modify recipes?

Yes, as long as you make a gallon of food or more. Not suitable as a broth alone, must be used with food.

Why didn't mine fizz well?

The two typical reasons are that the water wasn't hot enough or too much of the water cooked off. Use a lid.  Also, if you add Broth Bomb® while it's boiling, it will just appear to bubble along with the boiling water, which isn't as much fun but it will still do its job.

Will Broth Bomb™ alkalize the gut?

No, it finishes mildly acidic. Broth Bomb™ is designed to interact with the food prior to digestion. The fizz ingredients degrade during cooking; they release gas and minerals when boiled. Cook thoroughly. 

Do beans need Broth Bomb™?

No, beans breakdown during cooking on their own. The lectins degrade. Beans are nutritious as long as they're cooked well. It's the tannic acids in the skins that Broth Bomb™ may help break down, releasing more minerals from the beans. If you wanted to take the time, soaking and boiling dry beans in baking soda water before cooking is another way to get softer beans. But that might leach minerals into the water, which is then discarded. The Broth Bomb™ method retains those minerals.

Do they help prevent gas associated with beans?

They might. First, we want to acknowledge that according to research people who regularly eat beans don't have more gas than anyone else. But someone eating a meat and refined food heavy diet may experience more gas and discomfort when trying to eat more beans for the first few weeks until their gut microbiome (bacteria) has transitioned. Broth Bomb® might be helpful during this time at breaking down the raffinose sugar compound associated with gas; there is research supporting the use of baking soda when preparing beans.

How do I prevent burning stews?

If you have the time, slower and lower temperature cooking is better with bean stews to prevent burning the bottom. If you have less time you can cook at higher heat and stir frequently to prevent burning the bottom of the stew. We like to use more water than directed, boil it at the end for a few minutes, then add a little flour or flax to thicken into a stew.

Can they help treat disease?

We make no claims that they can be used to treat any disease. While baking soda and citric acid have been used to effectively treat certain conditions like GERD, SIBO, UC, and metabolic acidosis, we can't make any such claims. The ingredients breakdown in the stew, they become mineral compounds and water, the CO2 bubbles out.

Do they improve protein absorption?   

Beans contain some anti-nutrients that hold onto some of the nutrients, some of which are acids. The high pH of the baking soda dissolves the acids and unlocks the proteins. There are other methods of achieving this to different degrees, like simply cooking beans makes them digestible and nutritious. Proteins are made up of amino acids, which also breakdown better in alkaline environments. So, we don't know exactly how much our product helps, but we know using high pH substances like baking soda will improve protein absorption from legumes.

 Are they low sodium?

They're reduced sodium compared to canned soups. We don't have any sodium free or low sodium blends at the moment. We recommend using half of one in the same size recipe. Compared to other seasonings they have a higher ratio of herbs and spice compared to salt. You can see the exact sodium content on each product's page shown in the photo of the packaging. Here's more info on sodium.

Are they organic?

No, not at this time. We wouldn't be able to source all organic herbs and spices. But herbs and spices are generally avoided by pests, so pesticides often aren't used.

Are they considered whole food plant-based?

No. While the recipes can be wfpb and Broth Bomb® is made from simple safe ingredients, they still contain sodium and citrate. Broth Bomb™ Co-Founder, Andrew, eats mostly wfpb. We hope to be the catalyst for so many people looking to transition to eating more whole food plant-based meals. 

Why recommend frozen and canned ingredients?

They're easier to manage for busy or less abled people. Spinach and broccoli are notorious for going bad in the fridge before getting around to using them. Frozen vegetables retain their vitamins as well as or better than normal produce. Minerals are always retained, even in canned beans and even after cooking. Of course, you can always use normal produce and dry beans in your meal. Just cook the dry beans before adding everything else.

What's with the hash browns?

We like to suggest easy cooking hacks in our recipes to help cut down on prep time and effort. You can always chop up potatoes instead.